October 24, Bl John Adalbert (Jan Wojciech) Balicki

October 24
In the Archdiocese of Przemyśl
BLESSED JOHN ADALBERT BALICKI, PRESBYTER
Obligatory memorial

John Adalbert (Jan Wojciech) Balicki was born in Staromieście near Rzeszów on 25 January 1869. He entered the seminary in Przemyśl, where he was ordained on 20 July 1892. He was a fervent lecturer, tutor and finally the rector of the Przemyśl Seminary. He was famous as a confessor, spiritual director and, above all, a man of prayer and paragon of humility. He died on 15 March 1948 in Przemyśl. He was beatified by John Paul II in Kraków on 18 August 2002.

Common of Pastors.

[PDF Version]

OFFICE OF READINGS

SECOND READING

From a conference of Blessed John Balicki, presbyter, “On Prayer”
(Selected Works, vol. II, pp. 100-102)
Humble Prayer

“Watch and pray that you may not undergo the test.” Prayer is the safest weapon during the fight with sin, temptations and the devil. It grants us God’s help, i.e. efficacious grace. Many pray, yet fall. St James the Apostle answers, “You do not receive, because you ask wrongly.”

When is prayer good? Only when it is prepared, “But when you pray, go to your inner room, close the door, and pray to your Father.” It is good when it is done in the name of Jesus, “Amen, I say to you, whatever you ask the Father in my name he will give you.” Prayer ought to be humble too, according to St Peter’s teaching, “And all of you, clothe yourselves with humility for God opposes the proud but bestows favour on the humble.” Humbly means with respect and confessing absolute dependence on God, admitting before him to being nothingness, sin, weakness, misery on our own and unworthy of being heard, expecting to be granted what we ask for only through mercy.

We ought to pray without resignation – it is another condition of good prayer. “Rejoice always. Pray without ceasing. In all circumstances give thanks, for this is the will of God for you in Christ Jesus.” In prayer one has to be persistent and zealous, even though the internal and external obstacle might pile up, or the waiting be tiring. For the Scripture says, “Rejoice in hope, endure in affliction, persevere in prayer.” One cannot neglect fervour, but increase it.

May our prayer come from the pure heart, purified by contrition, for “God will not spurn a humbled and contrite heart.” Let us approach prayer with great hope in the fact that it will be heard. First of all because prayer is an expression of trust; secondly, it is a promise, “ask and it will be given to you.” Hence, St James writes, “he should ask in faith, not doubting.” One should pray piously, which means with concentration think of God, looking at him with their soul’s eye. The last condition of good prayer is to ask the Creator through the merits of the Passion and redemptive Death of our Lord Jesus Christ., through the intercession of his Blessed Mother and under the influence of the Holy Spirit.[1]

RESPONSORY Psalm 119:65; 71; 68

Lord, you have been good to your servant according to your word.
It was good for me to be afflicted, to learn your will.

You are good and your deeds are good; teach me your commandments.
It was good for me to be afflicted, to learn your will.

CANTICLE OF ZECHARIAH

Ant. Blessed are the meek, for they will inherit the land, blessed are the merciful, for they will be shown mercy.

CONCLUDING PRAYER

O God,
you called Blessed John Adalbert, presbyter, to serve the work of your mercy with humble heart,
grant through his intercession that we, imitating the humbleness of your Son, may attain the joy of his kingdom.
Who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit,
one God, for ever and ever.
Amen.

CANTICLE OF MARY

Ant. The Lord has cast down the mighty from their thrones, and has lifted up the lowly.

Congregatio de Cultu Divino et Disciplina Sacramentorum. Probatum seu confirmatum, die 28 octobris 2004, Prot. 919/04/L.

[1] Translated by DChojnacki (2014).

 

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